Blog Post No.3

this week’a focus in my pop culture class was the form of journalism through comics. After reading Persepolis, Journalism, How Comics Journalism Brungs Stories to Life,  Comics Journalism Comics Activism, The Power and range of the Graphic Novel Memoir, ‘They Planted Hatred In Our Hearts’, and the discussions in class all I could think about was how effective this form of journalism was to inform people of critical real life issues to people all ages because as Jared Gardaner in Comics Journalim, Comics Activism said “it’s not just for kids anymore.” Patrick Cockburn in ‘They Planted Hatred In Our Hearts’, mentions how certain events will bring up little international attention and the be forgotten about. It is so true, there are so many things that go on around the world that should be known and brought up more but our generation is no longer into watching the news or reading textbooks to become informed. I believe that the way comics work with the images is a better way to get people engaged in what it is they are reading. Julie Gerstein says in The Power and range of the Graphic Novel Memoir, “The images in these memoirs can act to big reinforce and contradict the powerful emotional messages held forth in their pages.” Which is why I like that in How Comics Journalism Brings Stories to Life, Rui Kaneya mentions that Hibdon, an illustrator tries to make it a point to go on as many reporting trips when possible; I find it important for the artists who are illustrating the pictures for the comics to be present when the reporting is being done so that they first hand can see the emotion of those being reported on and get the feel of the actual scene so that they can make a good depiction and make the readers feel like they themselves are present too.  I completely agree, with comics people can become so engaged and lost into what they are reading and seeing through these pictures because they could reflect brutal and critical honesty towards all the players in this ongoing tragedy (Jared Gardner). Although since comic’s form of images is like cartoons I also believe how Julie Gerstein mentioned that readers can choose to connect or disconnect with the information they are intaking. Peole will do as they please with what they gain but comic journalism I think is still a very smart and effective way to highlight and enhance the emotionally fraught images with words and vice versa(Julie Gerstein), to inform and educate those who can’t become engaged in other forms of news.

 

Kenaya, R. (2014). How Comic Journalism Brings Stories to Life. Retrieved from http://archives.cjr.org/united_states_project/illustrated_press_chicago_comics_journalism.php

Gardner, J. (2012). Comic Journalism, Comic Activism. Retrieved from http://www.publicbooks.org/comics-journalism-comics-activism/

Gerstein, J. (2012). The Power and Range of the Graphic Novel Memoir. Retrieved from http://www.signature-reads.com/2012/05/the-power-and-range-of-the-graphic-novel-memoir/

Cockburn, P. (2009). ‘They Planted Hatred In Our Hearts’. Retrieved from https://mobile.nytimes.com/2009/12/27/books/review/Cockburn-t.html?_r=1&&referer=

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1 thought on “Blog Post No.3”

  1. Very good job with your blog, Maria! I really like how you mention that with comics a reader can engage or disengage—they have control over how much or how little they take in. With television and film, unless we turn the television off or walk out of the theater, we can’t control the information so it can become overwhelming. But, with comics because we have to work with the medium, bridge the gaps between the cells and panels of each part of the comic, we can take something in slowly or skip over it quickly. Each time we go back and read something again, we see something new, and we go deeper into the story line. With television, photography, and film we can just close our eyes and miss so much. But, with comics we can sit with it, and digest it slowly, which is so useful when reading about heavy issues like war and trauma.

    Excellent post!
    10/10

    Like

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